Home > Grade 3 (page 2)

Grade 3

Building Shelves 2

Directions: Use the numbers 0 – 9, no more than one time each, to make the following problem true. Ricky is building ? sets of shelves for the office. It takes him ? ? minutes to do each set of shelves. He’ll be done building the sets in ? hours and ?? minutes. Source: Chase Orton

Read More »

Building Shelves 1

Directions: Use the numbers 0 – 9, no more than one time each, to make the following problem true. Ricky is building ? sets of shelves for the office. It takes him ? ? minutes to do each set of shelves. He’ll be done building the sets in ? hours. Source: Chase Orton

Read More »

It’s About Time 1

Directions: Use the numbers 0 – 9, no more than one time each, to make the following problem true. Suzie leaves work at ? : ? ?. She get’s home at ? : ? ?. Therefore, her commute is ? ? minutes long. Source: Chase Orton

Read More »

Close to 1000

Directions: Arrange the digits 1-9 into three 3-digit whole numbers. Make the sum as close to 1000 as possible. Source: John Ulbright and Robert Kaplinsky

Read More »

Double Bar Graph

Directions: Using the numbers 1-8 at most once each time, create a graph that represents the number of boys and girls participating in soccer, football, baseball and basketball. Half as many boys play soccer than girls The amount of boys in soccer is double the amount girls in football Three times as many boys play baseball than girls in football …

Read More »

Interpreting Graphs

Directions: Using the numbers 1 to 6, using a number only once, create a graph and fill in the blanks to make them true. Source: Bryan Anderson

Read More »

Biggest Rectangle

Directions: Find the largest area for the rectangle filling the boxes with numbers 1 through 9. You may use a digit at most once. Source: Nanette Johnson, Inspired by Mike Chamberlain’s Problem

Read More »

Greatest Difference of Two Rounded Numbers

Directions: Using the digits 0 through 9, find the two numbers that, when rounded to 500 have the greatest possible difference. Each digit can only be used once. Source: Michael Wiernicki and Graham Fletcher

Read More »