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High School: Geometry

Transformations

Directions: Given triangle ABC with vertices (-8,2), (-2,2), and (-2, 8), create triangle DEF in quadrant one that uses a translation, rotation, and reflection (in any order) to take that triangle to triangle ABC and show congruence. Source: Jon Henderson

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Midpoint Formula

Directions: Create two pairs of coordinates on the same line segment that have M (3,4) as their midpoint. Source: Dane Ehlert

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Coordinate Parallelograms

Directions: Fill in the x and y coordinates using whole numbers 1-9, without repetition, so that the points make a parallelogram. Source: Daniel Torres-Rangel

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Creating Right Triangles 2

Directions: Using only the whole numbers 1 through 8 (without repeating any number), fill in the coordinates to create the vertices of a right triangle: A(__, __), B(__, __), C(__, __) Extension: Try to do this using only the whole numbers 1 through 6. Source: Erick Lee

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Creating Rectangles 2

Directions: Using only the whole numbers 1 through 8 (without repeating any number), fill in the coordinates to create the vertices of a rectangle: A(__, __), B(__, __), C(__, __), D(__, __). Extension: What is the rectangle with the largest/smallest area/perimeter that you can find? Source: Erick Lee

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Line of Reflections on Isosceles Triangles

Directions: How many ways can you determine the location of the line of reflection for isosceles triangle XYZ that maps Point X to Point Z? Source: Irvine Math Project, Nanette Johnson, and Robert Kaplinsky.

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Law of Cosines Triangle

Directions: Use the numbers 1-9 (using each number no more than once) to fill in the circles of a triangle. The sum of the numbers on each side of the triangle is equal to the length of that side. What is the triangle with the largest (or smallest) angle measure that you can make? Source: Erick Lee

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Create Squares

Directions: Create a square with one of the vertices at (2,3). Fill in the blanks with whole numbers 0 through 9, using each number at most once, to show the rest of the vertices of the square. Bonus: Find more than one set of vertices. Source: John Mahlstedt

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