Home > Tag Archives: DOK 2: Skill / Concept

Tag Archives: DOK 2: Skill / Concept

Dividing Monomials

Directions: Use the whole numbers 1 through 10, at most one time each, and fill in the boxes to make the statement true Source: Richard Hung

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Fraction Exponents

Directions: Using the digits 1 through 9, at most one time each, to fill in the boxes to make the statement true. Source: Shaun Errichiello

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Adding Fractions 4

Directions: Using the whole numbers 1 through 10, at most one time each, fill in the boxes so that the sum is equal to 1 whole. Source: Joshua Nelson

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Rounding Decimals

Directions: Use the whole numbers 1 through 6, at most one time each, to fill in the boxes and make the largest (or smallest) number that rounds to 5 Source: Annie Forest

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Trigonometric Equation

Directions: Use the numbers 1 – 9, without repetition, to fill in the blanks and make the trigonometric equation below true: Source: Kevin Rees

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Missing Digits

Directions: Fill in the blanks with digits to make the answer closer to 200 than 300. What is one solution? What other solutions can you find? How many possible solutions are there? How many possible solutions if you can’t use a digit more than once? Source: Marilyn Burns, Graham Fletcher

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Multiplying Fractions 3

Directions: Find three fractions whose product is -5/24. You may use fractions between -8/9 to 8/9 no more than one time each. Find at least 2 possible combinations. Source: Al Oz

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Dividing by 1-digit numbers

Directions: Use the whole numbers 1 through 9, at most one time each, and fill in the boxes to create the smallest (or largest) whole number quotient. Source: Ellen Metzger

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Surface Area and Volume of Prisms

Directions: What is the least amount and greatest amount of surface area possible on a rectangular prism with a volume of 64 cubic inches? (Use whole numbers only) Source: Marie Isaac, Katrin Marti, Ryan Turner

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Absolute Deviation

Directions: Using only numbers 1-9 (without repeating any number), fill in the boxes to create a set of data with the largest possible absolute deviation. Source: Mark Alvaro

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