Home > Tag Archives: DOK 2: Skill / Concept (page 12)

Tag Archives: DOK 2: Skill / Concept

Missing Digits

Directions: Fill in the blanks with digits to make the answer closer to 200 than 300. Source: Marilyn Burns and Graham Fletcher

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Multiplying Fractions 3

Directions: Find three fractions whose product is -5/24. You may use fractions between -8/9 to 8/9 no more than one time each. Find at least 2 possible combinations. Source: Al Oz

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Dividing by 1-digit numbers

Directions: Using the digits 1 through 9 at most one time each, fill in the boxes to create the smallest (or largest) whole number quotient. Source: Ellen Metzger

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Surface Area and Volume of Prisms

Directions: What is the least and greatest amount of surface area possible on a rectangular prism with a volume of 64 cubic inches and whole number side lengths? Source: Marie Isaac, Katrin Marti, and Ryan Turner

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Absolute Deviation

Directions: Using only numbers 1-9 (without repeating any number), fill in the boxes to create a set of data with the largest possible absolute deviation. Source: Mark Alvaro

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Pocket Change

Directions: You have $1.00 in your pocket. You only have pennies, nickels, and dimes. You don’t have any quarters or other coins. What coins are in your pocket? Source: Andrew Gael

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Distributive Property 2

Directions: Using the digits 0 to 9 at most one time each, fill in the boxes to make a true equation. Source: Adrianne Burns

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Standard Deviation

Directions: Using only numbers 1-9 (without repeating any number), fill in the boxes to create a set of data with the largest possible standard deviation. Source: Mark Alvaro

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Distributive Property

Directions: Using the digits 1 to 9 at most one time each, fill in the boxes to make a true equation. Source: Adrianne Burns

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Volume of Rectangular Prisms

Directions: Using the digits 1 through 9, at most one time each, fill in the boxes to create 2 rectangular prisms so the volume of one rectangular prism is double the volume of the other rectangular prism. Source: Joe Schwartz

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