Tag Archives: DOK 3: Strategic Thinking

Area of a Triangle in the Coordinate Plane

Directions: Use the digits 0 to 9, at most one time each, to fill in ordered pairs for all three points, such that the area of Triangle ABC is closest to 6 square units. A ( ___, ___ ) B ( ___, ___ ) C ( ___, ___ ) Source: Henry Wadsworth

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L’Hospital’s Rule Exploration

Directions: Using the digits 1 to 9, at most one time each, create 3 different expressions such that their graphs contains any 2 of the 3 following criteria: 1) Horizontal Asymptote @ y = some positive rational number 2) Slant Asymptote with a slope such that: 1 < m ≤ 2 3) Two Vertical Asymptotes Source: Gregory L. Taylor, Ed.D.

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Square Root Expression

Directions: Using the digits 1 to 9, at most one time each, fill in the boxes to make the following expression as close to 0 as possible. Source: Erick Lee

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Triangle Sum Theorem

Directions: Using the digits 1-9 at most one time each, fill in the blanks so that when you solve for x, it is a whole number. Source: Franco D. Adkins

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Adding and Subtracting Integers

Directions: Using the digits 1 to 6, at most one time each, fill in the boxes so that top two equations are equal and the bottom equation has the greatest value. Source: Kate Nerdypoo

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Perimeter & Circumference

Directions: Using the digits 1-6, at most one time each, fill in the boxes to create the largest and smallest combined perimeter/circumference for the rectangle and circle. Source: Christin Smith

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Fraction Multiplication Equal to 1

Directions: Use the digits 1 to 9, at most one time each, to fill in the boxes so that the three fractions have a product as close to 1 as possible. Source: Patrick Vennebush

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Multiplication of large numbers

Directions: Use the digits 1 to 9, at most one time each, to create two numbers that have a product as close to 500,000 as possible. NOTE: You may use any length of factors as you would need. Ex 8 digit by 1 digit. 4 digit by 3 digit. Source: Miles Knight

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Compound Inequalities 1

Directions: Using the digits 1 to 9, at most one time each, make a compound inequality that has the largest interval. Source: Robert Kaplinsky

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