Grade 5

Equivalent Expressions with Fractions

Directions: Using the digits 0 to 9 at most one time each and choosing either multiplication/division or addition/subtraction, place a digit in each box to make a true statement. Source: Brian Errey

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Volume of Three Rectangular Prisms

Directions: Using the digits 1 to 9 at most one time each, find the dimensions of three rectangular prisms so that their volumes are as close as possible. Note: diagram may not be drawn to scale. Source: Daniel Walker

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Volume of Rectangular Prisms 2

Directions: Using the digits 1 through 9, at most one time each, place a digit in each box to create two rectangular prisms where the larger one has the greatest possible volume and is double the volume of the other. Source: Joe Schwartz and Robert Kaplinsky

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Dividing Fractions 4

Directions: Using the digits 1 through 9, at most one time each, place a digit in each box to create an equation with the greatest possible quotient. Source: Robert Kaplinsky

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Dividing Fractions 3

Directions: Using the digits 1 through 9, at most one time each, place a digit in each box to create two true equations: one where the quotient is greater than 40 and one where it’s less than 40. You may reuse the same digits for each of the equations. Source: Robert Kaplinsky

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Multiplying Fractions 6

Directions: Using the digits 1 to 9 at most one time each, place a digit in each box to make a product that’s as close to 4/11 as possible. Source: Robert Kaplinsky

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Multiplying Fractions 5

Directions: Using the digits 1 to 9 at most one time each, place a digit in each box to make a true equation. Source: Robert Kaplinsky

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Multi-Digit Multiplication 2

Directions: Using the digits 0 to 9 at most one time each, place a digit in each box to create a true equation with the greatest possible product. Source: Robert Kaplinsky

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Rounding Decimals 3

Directions: Using the digits 0 to 9 at most one time each, place a digit in each box to create two different decimals that are equivalent when rounded to the nearest tenth and have the least possible value. Source: Robert Kaplinsky

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